Friday, July 12, 2013

Camping - Things to Bring to an Oldtime Music Festival

Clifftop - Photo by Kathy Brown
Clifftop, which spans the last week of July/first part of August, will be my first oldtime music camping excursion of the summer, having missed Mt. Airy, Highland County, Elk Creek, and some of the others that come before it.  We’ll be setting up camp a few days before the festival officially begins, when the crowds are thinner and not all the vendors are set up yet.  This requires a bit more planning.  Rockbridge is another mountain music festival my wife and I are going to later this season.  After some haphazard camping last year, I’ve started to make a...

LIST OF THINGS TO BRING TO AN OLDTIME MUSIC FESTIVAL

Musical instrument(s).  Duh.

Tent – this is car camping, not backpacking, so why not get a roomy, comfortable tent that you can stand up in?  Preferably one that will keep you dry during the inevitable rainstorms.  I just nabbed the Eureka Copper Canyon on sale for $154 online.  The REI Hobitat also looks like a good choice, but is a bit more expensive.  Both of these tents are tall enough to stand up in.

Shelter – last year I bought the REI Alcove shelter and like it a lot.  Easy to set up.  Does well in the wind and rain.
  
Propane camp stove and grill table.  If you plan on making some of your own meals, this is a must.  Camping World seems to have the best prices on these types of camp tables.  See here and here.

Sleeping Pad/Mattress – I’ve had bad luck with big air beds – they always seem to leak air overnight.  However, the thin, lightweight sleeping pads designed for backpackers like the Therm-a-Rest are surprisingly comfortable and durable.  I’ve also considered using a portable foam pad, like these Tri-Fold Exercise Mats.

Armless Folding Chairs for jamming.  The locker room timeout stools that basketball players use would be perfect for taking to festivals, but I can’t find anyone willing to sell a small quantity of these chairs.  The best thing I can find are these small folding chairs on Amazon. 

Here are some other miscellaneous things to remember to bring:
Baby wipes
Batteries
Beer/booze
Book
Bug spray
Cash
Coffee
Coffee Percolator/French Press
Cooler
Cups and mugs
Digital Recorder
Duct tape
Ear plugs
Extra strings, picks
First aid kit
Flip flops for the shower
Food and snacks
Ground cover footprint
Hand sanitizer
Ibuprofen and antacids
Immodium
Instrument stand
Jumper cables
Lantern/flashlights
Mallet for driving in tent stakes
Oven mitts
Paper and pen
Paper plates and plastic utensils
Paper towels
Pillow
Piss jug – for when you don’t feel like leaving your tent
Pocket knife
Portable phone charger
Pot and/or pan
Rain gear
Razors/shaver
Reusable water bottle
Skillet
Sleeping bag
Soap/Shampoo
Spatula
Sun screen
Tapestries for shade/decoration
Tarp
Toilet paper
Towel
Trash bags
Umbrella
Warm clothes
Water
Zip lock bags

Can you think of anything else? 

3 comments:

  1. Folding recliner chairs for lounging and passing out in make for a comfortable campsite. Extra tarps can be a big help for covering things up during storms. Instrument stands make your instruments handy and let you get cases out of the way.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Woody. Definitely don't want to forget instrument stands. Also just added Digital Recorder to the list!

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  2. You forgot your wife!

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